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About Our Seminars

The following seminars are approved by IDCEC and deliver CEU's


 

"THE INTERNATIONAL BUILDING CODE FOR INTERIORS"
©2013 Kimberly A. Marks
Presented by: Kimberly A. Marks, NCIDQ, RID, ASID

Course Objectives
To help designers become more proficient in referencing and applying Building Codes to interiors projects and understand the interconnectedness of the design disciplines in the process. The International Building Code is the primary model code used throughout the United States. Course content distills the IBC down to relevant code sections, chapters and working examples that illustrate fundamental code concepts applied in commercial interiors.

 

Content Outline
Part I Overview of Model Code Agencies 20 minutes
Part II Using Building Codes in Interiors 20 minutes
Part III Introduction to International Building Code 50 minutes
Break   15 minutes
Part IV Means of Egress 60 minutes
Part V Application - Working examples 30 minutes

 

Total Presentation                         3 Hours

NOTE:  This course is offered in one, two and three hour sessions.  Course content and detail varies to meet each program's timeframe.

Intended Audience
This course is targeted for interior designers and architects that are involved in the design of commercial interior buildings and spaces and for any designer who would like to know more about building codes, code agencies, building code development and how codes play a part in the design process.

Brief Description of Course:
This course is delivered in the four parts described in the Content Outline.

Part One.
Talks to the purpose of codes, why and how they are developed. Includes a brief history of the model code agencies, the formation of the International Code Council, why ICC was formed, and where the ICC codes are in their adoption across the country.

Part Two.
Will familiarize attendees as to what codes are, how codes are written and adopted, and when and how to use them.

Part Three.
A concise overview of the International Building Code, of chapters and concepts essential to the planning and design of interiors including Chapters 1-12 and Chapter 29.

Part Four.
A focused look at Chapter 10, Means of Egress provides a comprehensive examination of exit system components that combined make up the means of egress. The process of applying means of egress concepts, determination of occupant load, travel distance and exiting requirements are clarified through working examples and illustrations.

 

“THE INTERNATIONAL RESIDENTIAL CODE FOR INTERIORS”

©2013 Kimberly A. Marks
Presented by: Kimberly A. Marks, NCIDQ, RID, ASID

Course Objectives

To help designers become more proficient in referencing and applying the International Residential Code to residential projects.  The International Residential Code is the primary model code referenced for one and two family dwellings, including townhomes.  Course content distills the IRC down to relevant code sections and chapters that are applied in interior design practice.

 

Content Outline
Part A Introduction to the International Residential Code 15 minutes
Part B Building Planning and Construction 50 minutes
Part C Minimum Standards 10 minutes
Part D Checklist  5 minutes
Part E Questions 10 minutes
     

Total Presentation                              1.5 Hours

Intended Audience

This course is targeted for interior designers that are involved in the design of residential buildings and interior spaces and for any designer who would like to know more about building codes, code agencies, building code development and how codes play a part in the design process.

Brief Description of Course:

This course is delivered in the four parts described in the Content Outline.

Part A.  Informs what types of building apply to the IRC, the purpose of codes,  why and how they are developed.  Includes a brief history of the model code agencies, the formation of the International Code Council, why ICC was formed, and where the ICC codes are in their adoption across the country.

Part B. Will familiarize attendees as to the prescriptive language in Chapter 3 that serves to regulate minimum standards, dimensions, and safety elements in residential home design.

Part C.  Will familiarize attendees about the fixture and appliance labeling requirements required by the code.

Part D.  Will review an example of a Building Planning Department checklist of items regulated by the code that may be used for reference when applying the IRC to projects.

Part E.  Question and answer period.

 

"Furniture Planning That Meets Building Codes ”

©2013 Kimberly A. Marks
Presented by: Kimberly A. Marks, NCIDQ, RID, ASID

Course Objectives

To identify and clarify what sections of the international Building Code apply to furniture planning in commercial interiors. While defining perscriptive space clearances this course also covers rules of thumb and recommended dimensions that help promote the best operational flow and ease of use in varing types of interiors, such as office, merchantile, conference and library spaces.  Means of egress for systems furniture planning is covered in detail.  This course is consistantly among the most popular offered at NEOCON Conferences.

 

Content Outline
Part A Introduction to the International Building Code 10 minutes
Part B Exit Acess 10 minutes
Part C Planning Requirements and Recommendations 15 minutes
Part D Top Ten Means of Egress 15 minutes
Part E Questions 10 minutes
     

Total Presentation                            1.0 Hour

Intended Audience

This course is targeted for interior designers that are involved in the furniture planning of commercial spaces and for any designer who would like to know more about building codes and how codes play a part in the design process.

Brief Description of Course:

This course is delivered in the four parts described in the Content Outline.

Part A.  Introduces the International Building Code and informs what sections and chapters must be referenced for furniture planning to meet codes.

Part B. Covers the Exit Access requirements that apply to furniture layouts.

Part C.  Talks about the perscriptive nature of the code, and how it defines minimum clearances.  There are rules of thumb that provide a more comfortable balance of  furniture, people and space..

Part D.  Covers the "Top Ten" Means of Egress requirements that are the most common code sections referenced in the planning of furniture, especially systems furniture.

Part E.  Question and answer period.

 

“STRUCTURES IN INTERIOR DESIGN ”

©2013 Kimberly A. Marks

Presented by: Kimberly A. Marks, NCIDQ, RID, ASID

Course Objectives

To provide a practical, non-technical base of understanding of building structures and relate that understanding to how interior designers interface with these systems.  The purpose of broadening an interior designer’s knowledge of structural design is not to afford them the “know how” to consult on such matters, but rather to increase awareness of how interior design decisions can affect the integrity of building structures.

 

Content Outline
Part I Introduction  5 minutes
Part II Structural Loads & Components 10 minutes
Part III Inspection 15 minutes
Part IV Planning 20 minutes
Part V Summary  5 minutes
Part VI Questions  5 minutes

 

Total Presentation                 1 Hour    

Intended Audience

This course is targeted for interior designers who are involved in the planning and design of building interiors and for those who would like to know more about the fundamentals of building structures and how to knowingly work around and with these systems, to maintain a buildings’ structural integrity.

Brief Description of Course:

This information of this course is delivered in the order of the outline described above the Content Outline.

Introduction.  Asks “What do interior designers need to know about structural design?”

To which it answers “They need to know what they don’t know”, meaning that that they must be aware of structures and how to identify them in order to avoid them and thereby maintain them.

Structural Loads.  Describes the primary forces and loads that act against structures

Structural Components.  Describes the general terminologies of structural components.

Inspection:  Identification of the structural elements requires inspecting the space to be designed and the accuracy of the plans to be used.  Other important factors such as signs of distress and observance of fire rated construction are discussed.  All new construction must maintain existing fire protection levels of structural members and fire rated assemblies.

Planning:  Talks about how to plan with and around existing structures.  Space planning examples identify working with versus against existing elements such as columns and window mullions.  Plumbing and electrical additions are shown as examples where structural elements must be avoided if floor penetrations are necessary.  Heavy floor loading from office filing systems is show as an example where live loads may be exceeded.  Coordination of finishes and finish transitions at expansion joints are discussed as well as the importance of identifying their existence and location in floor plans.  Planning for adequate bracing at all walls and ceilings where fixtures and casework are planned is also discussed.

Summary:  Six items summarize the material discussed as the fundamental areas where the practice of interior design interfaces with building structures.

Questions.  There will be time remaining for a question and answer period.